Friday, August 2, 2013

plus potuit, quia plus amavit


How many times did we all hear "it's okay, it's all going to be okay" when we were kids? Scraped knees and hurt feelings were all soothed with this phrase.
I'm not sure when we decided that "okay" was what we were shooting for, but somehow the reassurance still works.
--My Very Wise Roommate



For through your 
goodness we have received
the wine we offer--
the absent-minded priest paused as he tentatively held the chalice aloft.
He stopped abruptly.
Wait. Have I already said this part?
As he paused, he suspended the moment in the air along with the chalice.
It felt as though there was a crinkle in the atmosphere.
The air was held back by the atmospheric fold the way water is trapped by a kink in a garden hose.
The elderly suburban ladies in pink tracksuits and pleated chinos chuckled and tittered and nodded yes.
The priest thank them and continued on, then.
Then he stopped.
Shook his head. He went back and re-lifted up the chalice.
I haven't said this part, he laughed at himself.
The ladies chuckled with good humor.
He laughed:
We offer and we offer and we offer...

~

There will come a moment when your love will fail.
Mostly simply because you are human, I am human, she and he are human, they are human, and we all are human.
And a love that's not perfect (that's "bent," as both C.S. Lewis and P!nk might say) sort of comes with the territory of being human.
Our love will always fall short of what it's supposed to be and what it could be and what it ought to be.
Looked at in purely human terms, "Love one another as I have loved you" is a taunt more than an instruction.
To love others like that is an impossible task for you and I, working on our own.
The love we bring to offer up to our brothers and sisters is really a love that's far short of what they deserve. If only we could do another human being the justice of giving them the love they ought to have.
And the love we bring to Christ to quench His eternal thirst for our love is like offering a thirsty man a dewdrop to drink.
And yet we offer it.
We offer it, in the faith that the love we bring to each table of offering, we may receive back one hundred fold, so that we may then turn to our brothers and sisters, and strengthen them.
So that the love we bring to them is no longer simply our own, imperfect love, but is a channel for a love far greater.

To love we must have faith. For faith in action is love, and love in action is service.
--Mother Teresa

Forget your perfect offering--whatever first fruits you bring may be rotten or cracked or broken or bent.
But it is through the cracks in the lamp that the light shines through.
The important point is to bring whatever little lamp you have received, cracked and broken though it may be. Or else there will be no light.
We offer and we offer and we offer.

The more we come to know that we are loved, the more we will live to return that love to God and to others. 
For what we lack, the good Lord will provide.
--John Conley, C.S.C.


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